Category Archives: responsive design

What’s New in BootsFaces 1.0?

BootsFaces 1.0 has been released. Actually, we’ve already published the first bugfix release, BootsFaces 1.0.1. I was a bit shy to proudly announce the 1.0.0 version because we had so many obstacles to overcome. Apart from the usual obstacles like exhausting projects at work (and they were exhausting this time!), there were also the earthquakes in Italy, which kept at least one of our team members busy, although they didn’t suffer any physical harm.

Be that as it may, BootsFaces 1.0 (and 1.0.1 in particular) is a great step to maturity. It’s the first version we officially call “production-ready”. Truth to tell, we were always convinced you can safely use BootsFaces in production. But most versions we’ve published in the past focused on features. This time we tried to focus on stability instead of new features when we prepared the 1.0 version. I counted 26 bugfixes that were important enough to open a bug ticket. Plus, almost twenty minor enhancements and three new components. However, we also added one or two major improvements, such as adding support for both horizontal and inline forms.

Download coordinates

Before starting the long list of details, let me provide you with the download coordinates:

Add these lines to your project’s pom.xml:

<dependency>
    <groupId>net.bootsfaces</groupId>
    <artifactId>bootsfaces</artifactId>
    <version>1.0.1</version>
    <scope>compile</scope>
</dependency>

Add this line to your project’s .gradle build file:

compile 'net.bootsfaces:bootsfaces:1.0.1'

The BootsFaces project comes with both a Gradle build file and a Maven build file. The Maven pom.xml is the easy way to get started and should suffice for most purposes. Only if you want to tweak and optimize BootsFaces, you need the Gradle build. In particular, the Maven build doesn’t generate the CSS and JS files itself, but relies on the output of the Gradle build. By the way, that’s the reason why we keep the generated file in GitHub.

In any case, the URL of the repository is https://github.com/TheCoder4eu/BootsFaces-OSP.

Update Dec 27, 2016: Bugs

During the last couple of days, we’ve found and fixed a couple of bugs. If you happen to run into a bug, check our bug tracker if we’ve already solved the bug, and check out the sneak preview version of BootsFaces 1.1.0-SNAPSHOT. Strictly speaking, this version is not intended to use productively. Use at own risk. Of course, BootsFaces is published under an Apache V2 license, so every version of BootsFaces is published on an “as-is” basis, without any warranties. The difference between the snapshot and the final version is that we’ve tested the final version more intensively.

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Newsflash: Material Design with Materialize.css

This morning I became aware of a nice CSS library: Materialize.css. In many respects, it reminds me of Bootstrap. Among other things, there’s a similar grid system, which is even slightly simpler and more logical than its Bootstrap counterpart. The class names are shorter, there are only three screen sizes, and my first impression it’s easier to learn “s, m, l” than “xs, sm, md, lg”.

Community support (speculative until confirmed by further research)

What caught my attention was the ambitious translation of the huge showcase. The German translation is pretty good, and my quick survey showed that the Spanish and French translations aren’t bad, either. Granted, the major part of the showcase is yet to be translated. But some time ago, I’ve started to translate the AngularFaces showcase to German. I didn’t manage to finish it because I ran out of time. So offering a large part of the Material.css showcase in ten (!) languages is no small feat. To me, that’s a good sign: I don’t think the four team members speak ten languages, so I render it likely that there’s a broad community support for Materialize.css.

Virtually every component you’ll ever need

The other thing that caught my eye is the large list of components. At first glance, everything you need to write a business application seems to be there: input fields, combo boxes, radio buttons, and checkboxes, just to name a few. Check boxes come with a nice twist: they optionally have an “indeterminate” style, which looks very intuitive to me. This makes Materialize.css one of the few UI libraries offering a convincing approach to three-state checkboxes. Another nice twist is the labels of input fields, which may optionally be displayed as watermarks until you enter your input. That’s one of the things difficult to explain but easy to show, so I recommend you follow this link to have a look yourself.

Wrapping it up

I’m big into Bootstrap, but even I have to admit that Google’s material design already has a big impact on the UI market. My crystal ball is currently slightly undecided, but chances are that Material Design is going to be one of the big things in the future of UI. Materialize.css isn’t the only Material Design implementation, but it’s clearly an interesting one.

What’s New in BootsFaces 0.8.5?

Fork me on GitHubWhat started as a small bugfix release, ended as a full-blown feature release. If the sheer number of commits is an indicator, the new release is awesome: the previous release counted 599 commits. In the meantime, 240 commits went into the 0.8.5 version, give or take a few. Needless to say, this amounts to a lot of added functionality: 11 new components, countless improvements and – of course – bugfixes. Plus, we’ve migrated the relaxed HTML-like markup style from AngularFaces to BootsFaces.

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What’s New in BootsFaces 0.7.0?

Fork me on GitHubBootsFaces 0.7.0 now is available at Maven Central. And in a couple of days it will arrive on the jCenter repository. It’s an update bringing you a host of new features. By the way, don’t get confused by the small version number: We’re convinced that BootsFaces is ready for production. It’s just the Unix tradition that makes us stick with small version numbers.

Download coordinates

BootsFaces is available in two different flavors. There’s the regular version at Maven Central, and there’s a highly-optimized version at GitHub. The optimized version is 50 KB smaller and should be a bit faster. Both versions are compiled with Java 1.6. Alternatively, you can check out the repository from GitHub and build BootsFaces from source.

Add these lines to your project’s pom.xml:

<dependency>
    <groupId>net.bootsfaces</groupId>
    <artifactId>bootsfaces</artifactId>
    <version>0.7.0</version>
    <scope>compile</scope>
</dependency>

Add this line to your project’s .gradle build file:

compile 'net.bootsfaces:bootsfaces:0.7.0'

The BootsFaces project comes with both a Gradle build file and a Maven build file. The Maven pom.xml is an easy way to get started, but if you want to tweak and optimize BootsFaces, you need the Gradle build.

In any case, the URL of the repository is https://github.com/TheCoder4eu/BootsFaces-OSP.

The showcase application is also available at Maven Central. It’s a war file you can simply deploy in a Tomcat. It’s the same application that runs on http://www.bootsfaces.net. The source codes are also available on GitHub.

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BootsFaces 0.6.5 Published on Maven Central

After a while, our team is finally proud to publish the new v0.6.5 release.
This time we added more examples, a couple of handy components and exciting features. Here’s a short summary of the highlights:

  • Font Awesome Support ( #23 , #39 , #53 )
  • compatibility to both Oracle Mojarra and Apache MyFaces
  • improved AngularFaces Integration
  • Primefaces integration
  • Omnifaces integration
  • and better documentation.

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BootsFaces 0.6.0 Now Available on Maven Central

Maven coordinates

BootsFaces – the JSF framework that makes Bootstrap much more accessible to JSF programmers – is now available on Maven Central. To use it, add a dependency to your Maven pom.xml file:

<dependency>
    <groupId>net.bootsfaces</groupId>
    <artifactId>bootsfaces</artifactId>
    <version>0.6.0</version>
</dependency>

Gradle users activate BootsFaces by adding this line to their .gradle build file:

compile 'net.bootsfaces:bootsfaces:0.6.0'

Minified version and debug-friendly version

The version I’ve uploaded to Maven Central is a developer-friendly version containing minified Javascript and CSS code, but non-minified Java class files. In other words: you can debug it, and you can easily identify the offending line if you find an error in your production log.

There’s also a version of BootsFaces that has been minified more aggressively. Currently, the smaller and slightly faster version hasn’t made it to Maven Central yet. You can download it at our project showcase and the project GitHub repository.

License

BootsFaces 0.6.0 is available both under a GPL 3 and a LGPL 3 license.

But I’m already using another JSF framework!

BootsFaces coexists peacefully with PrimeFaces, AngularFaces and probably most other JSF frameworks. For example, you can use the layout components of BootsFaces (<b:row>, <b:column>, <b:panelGrid>, <b:panel>, <b:tabView> / <b:tab> and <b:navBar>) together with the powerful input and datatable widgets of PrimeFaces.

Of course you can also use BootsFaces as a full-blown JSF component framework, providing responsive design and native Bootstrap GUIs. It’s up to you.

Kudos

BootsFaces is an open source framework initiated and led by Riccardo Massera. Thanks to Riccardo, Emanuele Nocentelli and everybody else who contributed! This includes everybody who gave us feedback by reporting errors or feature requests by opening an issue on the GitHub repository. Your feedback matters!

Wrapping it up

Visit our project showcase and enjoy!